Carrot Hummus

carrot hummus

 This carrot hummus recipe is quick, easy and delicious!  It’s especially wonderful when made with carrots fresh from the garden or Farmer’s Market! It’s super healthy, attractive, packed with protein and an excellent addition for a weight conscious diet.

Carrot Hummus

1 cup (packed) cooked carrots

1 can garbanzo beans (save liquid)

¼ cup tahini

2 Tbsp lemon juice (fresh is best)

2 garlic cloves, minced (I use 4)

½ tsp ground cumin

¼ tsp sea salt

2 Tbsp fresh parsley

 

Put all ingredients except parsley into food processor and blend until smooth. If consistency is too thick, thin with saved liquid from garbanzo beans. Add parsley and pulse a few times.

 

Refrigerate.

Prepare at least 2 hours before serving for flavors to blend.

Serve with chips or vegetable sticks.

The Dirty Dozen

EWG's Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen Plus ListsEach year I check out the current list for the “Dirty Dozen & Clean 15” which rate the pesticide levels in fruits and vegetables. Although I do not eat 100% organic foods, I do only buy organic fruits and vegetables listed in the Dirty Dozen. It’s so much easier to eat organic in the summer when most my fresh vegetables come from my organic garden!  Regarding meat, I started eating only free range organic chicken and eggs years ago. Next on my list to eliminate from my diet, conventionally raised pork. I am not only concerned about the health aspects of the food I eat but also the treatment of the animals. One step at a time…….

EWG’s 2013 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™

Eat fruits and vegetables!

The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Use EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides™ to reduce your exposures as much as possible, but eating conventionally-grown produce is far better than not eating fruits and vegetables at all. The Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ will help you determine which fruits and vegetables have the most pesticide residues and are the most important to buy organic. You can lower your pesticide intake by avoiding the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables and choosing the least contaminated produce.

Read below to see the Environmental Working Group’s 2013 list.

The Dirty Dozen — 2013

  • Apples
  • Celery
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Grapes
  • Hot peppers
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Potatoes
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet bell peppers.

The Clean Fifteen, 2013

  • Asparagus
  • Avocados
  • Cabbage
  • Cantaloupe
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapefruit
  • Kiwi
  • Mangoes
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Papayas
  • Pineapples
  • Sweet peas
  • Sweet potatoes